Recent analysis shows that online ammunition retailer, Ammo.com, has seen a significant increase in conversions and sales since February 23, 2020. The company reports that this surge corresponds with the public concern regarding the COVID-19 virus. According to Google Trends, starting on February 23, American interest over time (the site’s measurement matrix) of the term “coronavirus” has quadrupled, increasing from 22 to 100.

When compared to the 11 days before February 23 (February 12 to 22), in the 11 days after (February 23 to March 4), Ammo.com’s number of transactions increased 68%, and the company has seen a conversation rate increase of 45%.

Alex Horsman, the marketing manager at Ammo.com, said of the surge, “We know certain things impact ammo sales, mostly political events or economic instability when people feel their rights may end up infringed, but this is our first experience with a virus leading to such a boost in sales.” Horsman continued, “But it makes sense. A lot of our customers like to be prepared. And for many of them, it’s not just facemasks and TheraFlu. It’s knowing that no matter what happens, they can keep themselves and their families safe.”

So What Ammo Is Being Purchased?

When it comes to actual sales, Ammo.com’s increase varied among calibers and brands. Calibers that saw the largest increase include:

Sales also varied by state, with North Carolina and Georgia coming in with the largest increase (179% and 169% respectively). Other states included Pennsylvania (140%) andTexas (128%). Other states that saw a big boom are: 

Preppers across the nation have anticipated a global event that would warrant such inventory hoarding and purchasing. The Liberal Left has antagonized and miscategorized COVID-19 as a global “pandemic.” Democrats and the media have attempted to counter the success of the “Trump Economy,” ahead of the 2020 Presidential Election. When it comes to global emergencies, Americans, and especially those in the South, are turning to more traditional means of personal protection, which is worth its weight in gold, which has only risen 5.4 percent. 

For more information, contact Eric Wright.